Marketing

The Marketing track in the doctoral programme at TSM aims at preparing doctoral students for careers in academia and research-oriented firms and organisations in the various fields of the marketing discipline by focusing on a solid understanding of up-to-date scientific methods and insights into consumer psychology, customer empowerment and ethics, innovation, digital technologies and connectedness.

3 reasons to apply:

Courses are taught only in English.

Core courses

Learning and practice in research

Presentation and intended learning outcomes

A) Course description
The purpose of this course is to enhance and extend the research approaches of students and help them in the development of a research proposal. This course provides an understanding of the meaning of science research methods, an understanding of the assumptions underlying scientific research, and discusses replication and open science.

B) Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:
1. Question what is distinctive about “science”
2. Identify the different types of management research
3. Distinguish the different philosophical assumptions in management research
4. Discover the different steps of any research process
5. Clarify the sources of low replicability
6. Implement exact and conceptual replications
7. Implement reproducibility by adopting open science methods

Research skills

1. Knowledge and intellectual abilities: research methods; critical thinking; problem solving; argument construction.
2. Personal effectiveness: integrity; perseverance; responsibility; reputation.
3. Research governance and organization: project planning and delivery; ethics; research strategy.
4. Engagement, influence, impact: communication media; communication methods.

Management Science

Presentation and intended learning outcomes

A) Course description
A researcher needs to master the theoretic foundations of management science to develop her own research agenda. The purpose of this course is to discuss three basic theoretical models. The pedagogical approach will be based on active learning. Students will have to read specific articles or articles sections or book chapters before the courses. This material will then be discussed and analyzed collectively. The assessment also requires students to prepare the topics of the course in depth and to present their insights to the class.

B) Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:
1. Characterize the strength and limitations of different models
2. Describe some of the challenges of studying management theories
3. Distinguish the basics problems and issues at the center of organization theories
4. Identify the main results of agency theory and its applications to organizational design, governance and related issues
5. Survey the scope and stakes of behavioral psychology

Research skills

1. Knowledge and intellectual abilities: Subject knowledge; Academic literacy and management.
2. Personal effectiveness: Perseverance; Self-confidence; Time-management.
3. Research governance and organization: IPR and copyright; Project planning and delivery.
4. Engagement, influence, impact: Collegiality; Communication media; Communication methods.

Engaging with the scientific literature

Presentation and intended learning outcomes

A) Course description
This course aims at helping students to critically engage with the literature in the management sciences. We will discuss practical questions such as how best to get started with a literature review, how to read an article and which online tools to use. Students will be required to reflect on their own reading progress through a learning log and will also be asked to conduct a “practitioner translation” of a research paper, in order to encourage them to reflect on how to bridge the gap between the academic and the practitioner literature.


B) Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:
1. Review and synthetize fundamental themes in a field of research
2. Characterise what makes a good literature review
3. Describe and point out some of the problems with academic literature
4. Outline the contributions that different types of empirical research can (and cannot) make
5. Critisize your own approach to reading papers and to searching academic literatures
6. Summarise and synthetize a review of the literature
7. Specify how precisely academic literature can (and cannot) be applied
8. Translate academic insights into everyday language

Research skills

1. Knowledge and intellectual abilities: knowledge base; cognitive abilities.
2. Personal effectiveness: perseverance; self-reflection; integrity; time management.
3. Research governance and organization: project planning and delivery; ethics; IPR and copyrights.
4. Engagement, influence, impact: communication and dissemination.

Qualitative research

Presentation and intended learning outcomes

A) Course description
The aim of the course is to provide a general overview on qualitative research methods to students in all management disciplines. It discusses when a qualitative research approach is relevant and what type of research design and methods are suitable for collecting and analyzing qualitative data. In particular, the use and challenges of case studies approach are addressed. Students are introduced to main qualitative data collection (e.g. interviews, ethnography) and analysis techniques (e.g. coding, narrative and discourse analysis).


Through readings of articles or book chapters to prepare for each session, students will be made familiar with the most salient scholarly work structuring the field of qualitative research (see bibliography hereafter).


The objective is not to have students develop a strong competence or expertise on qualitative methods. The purpose is rather to develop awareness on the varieties of qualitative approaches as well as some basic knowledge on what kind of topics are relevant to be studied qualitatively, what main methodological challenges are faced as well as what type of conclusions can be drawn from qualitative research.

B) Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:
1. Recognize main qualitative methods and comprehend major challenges of data collection and analysis
2. Explain the difference between qualitative and quantitative research
3. Review qualitative research papers
4. Explain what topics are pertinent to study with a qualitative research approach
5. Distinguish how to interpret findings from a qualitative research and how to assess their validity
6. Collect and use qualitative data for exploratory studies

Research skills

1. Knowledge and intellectual abilities: Research methods; Language; Problem solving; Argument construction.
2. Personal effectiveness: Self-reflection; Self-confidence; Time management; Integrity.
3. Research governance and organization: Ethics; Research strategy; Project planning and delivery.
4. Engagement, influence, impact: Collegiality; Communication media; Communication methods.

Quantitative research

Presentation and intended learning outcomes

A) Course description

This course provides students with some basics of quantitative research. Students are first introduced to the core notions of research reliability and validity, to the variety quantitative research designs and data and to the epistemological bases of quantitative research. The second part of the course is dedicated to the presentation of factor analysis and regression techniques, with a hands-on perspective.


B) Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:

1. Select the appropriate explanatory method in accordance with the research problem and the available data
2. Determine the quality of used multi-item measurement instruments in quantitative research
3. Test a multiple linear regression, to assess whether the results can be trusted, and to analyze them
4. Test a binary logistic regression and analyze the results
5. Develop a mediation and moderation analyses thanks to a regression approach
6. Implement the Johnson-Neyman technique and the floodlight analysis

Research skills

1. Knowledge and intellectual abilities: Research methods; Academic literacy and management; Problem-solving.
2. Personal effectiveness: Integrity; Perseverance; Responsibility; Reputation.
3. Research governance and organization: Ethics; Research strategy; Project planning and delivery.
4. Engagement, influence, impact: Team working; Leadership; Communication methods; Communication media.

Experimental research

Presentation and intended learning outcomes

A) Course description
This course offers an introduction to experimental methods used in management and business science. The objective is to have students work on an experimental analysis of a research question that they are interested in. This course is mainly based on the reverse pedagogy with a Do-It-Yourself spirit. After an initial discussion regarding the main principles of the experimental methodology, students are invited to produce an experimental research project, that is, to find a research idea, to design and run a pilot experiment, and to analyze and present their results.


B) Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:
1. Explain the interest of experimental methods for research in management and business
2. Survey experimental research papers
3. Design an experiment

Research skills

1. Knowledge and intellectual abilities: Research methods; Academic literacy and management; Problem-solving.
2. Personal effectiveness: Self-conficence; Responsibility; Preparation and prioritisation.
3. Research governance and organization: Health; Ethics; Respect and confidentiality; Risk management.
4. Engagement, influence, impact: Team working; Collaboration; Communication methods; Communication media.

Library resources

Presentation and intended learning outcomes

A) Course description
This seminar introduces both digital and paper libraries in academic and research settings: full-text online resources accessible both on- and off-campus, including e-books, journal articles, newspapers, magazines, and databases. Primary emphasis is on information architecture and information access data for doctoral users.
Besides that, the librarians at the University can help you search for relevant and reliable information and data, select the best sources for your paper or project, and cite that information. Philippe Soleri can meet with you in person (one-on-one or in groups), and provide assistance.


B) Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:
1. Locate academic research papers
2. Review financial and market databases
3. Characterize open access
4. Describe plagiarism, copyright, quotations
5. Collect data

Research skills

1. Knowledge and intellectual abilities: Information seeking; Academic litteracy and management.
2. Research governance and organisation: Ethics; IPR and copyright; Appropriate practice.

Track specific courses

Theories and hot topics in marketing

Presentation and intended learning outcomes

A) Course description

Research in the marketing field is constantly evolving and it is crucial for MSc students to get an overview of the state-of-the-art knowledge on a variety of key topics. This course invites experts to talk about their respective research areas. Each professor presents the most influential theories and papers on a topic and help students comprehend the existing literature while guiding them in formulating further avenues for research.


B) Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:
1. Evaluate original research questions grounded in prevalent theories in marketing
2. Explain and critique recent and ongoing research in the marketing field
3. Develop some relevant and concrete implications for marketing strategy
4. Discuss research ideas with the professor and peer students

Research skills

1. Knowledge and Intellectual abilities: Knowledge base; cognitive abilities
2. Research governance and organisation: Ethics, principles and sustainability; research strategy
3. Engagement, Influence and Impact: communication methods, society and culture

Advanced methods in marketing research

Presentation and intended learning outcomes

A) Course description

Part 1: Interpretative Research in Marketing (Prof. Mathieu Alemany-Olivier)

Because people are like animals suspended in webs of significance they themselves have spun, and that these webs constitute what we call culture, the analysis of these webs of significance should be an interpretive science in search of meaning (Geertz 1973). The purpose of this module is to provide students with a deeper understanding of interpretive research in marketing, its requirements, and potential ethical issues. To do so, this module will combine required readings and in-class discussions, as well as short presentations given by the professor.


Part 2: Psychometry and Scale Development (Prof. Eric Vernette)

The measurement of construct is an important aspect of survey and experiments in marketing research. This part of the course is dedicated to the creation and validation of a valid measure for a construct.


Part 3: Structural Equation Modelling (Julien Cloarec)

  • Estimate the model fit
  • Justify the respecification of a model
  • Assess the significance of mediating effects
  • Assess the significance of moderated mediating effects
  • Discover new statistical resources
  • Implement new statistical resources


B) Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:
1. Determine and design an appropriate methodological plan for research projects
2. Describe and appraise the methodological choices and implementation in existing research
3. Experiment and discover various methodological paradigms with a respectful approach

Research skills

1. Knowledge and Intellectual abilities: Knowledge base; cognitive abilities
2. Personal effectiveness: Integrity; time management
3. Research governance and organisation: Ethics, principles and sustainability; research strategy; project planning and delivery
4. Engagement, Influence and Impact: communication methods

Perspectives in Marketing

Presentation and intended learning outcomes

A) Course description
The in-depth understanding of a research article is crucial to write a good literature review and identify theoretical gaps leading potentially to a new research question. This course requires from students to give a thorough oral presentation of research articles following each professor’s guidelines. They will be encouraged to conduct a critical and respectful analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of each paper. Special attention will be drawn on potential ethical issues emerging from the particular research. Finally, students will receive guidance and feedback about delivering clear oral rendition of an existing research in the academic context.


B) Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:
1. Synthesize and evaluate the conceptual development of exiting research papers and propose further avenues for research
2. Formulate a constructive critic of existing research
3. Relate and contrast the presented papers to other existing research within or outside thefield
4. Discuss an academic paper in an articulate and structured oral presentation
5. Debate the scientific rigor, integrity and ethics of published research

Research skills

1. Knowledge and Intellectual abilities: Knowledge base; cognitive abilities
2. Personal Effectiveness: Enthusiasm; integrity; self-confidence
3. Research governance and organisation: Ethics, principles and sustainability; research strategy
4. Engagement, Influence and Impact: communication methods, public engagement

Practitioner-oriented courses

Innovation, new technology acceptance model

Presentation and intended learning outcomes

A) Course description
Innovation and Technology Acceptance Modeling is strategically important for the firm’s survival and for retaining customers. Innovation involves using IT technologies and platforms to organize marketing as well as product/service and process innovation. The purpose of the Innovation and Technology Acceptance Modeling course is to expose students to some contemporary marketing aspects of innovation and new technology management. Research in the marketing field is constantly evolving and it is crucial for MSc students to get an overview of the state-of-the-art knowledge on a variety of key topics in technology acceptance. This course presents the most influential theories and papers on a topic and help students comprehend the existing literature while guiding them in formulating further avenues for research. Students will acquire the knowledge and skills to assess the impact and use of digital information technology and platforms, manage environmental change and risks, in the successful management of innovation and new technologies. The topics to be addressed cover strategic and operational Innovation Management, as well as new technology and service acceptance models. The course also exposes students to some behavioral, ethical and social issues arising from the usage of IT in the workplace.


B) Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:
1. Evaluate original research questions grounded in prevalent new technology/service acceptance theories in marketing
2. Explain and critique recent and ongoing research in the technology/service acceptance theories field
3. Design a Technology Acceptance Model-TAM and associated cognitive and social factors impacting adoption/usage (including hypotheses) and consequences of any given innovation (e.g. smart connected objects/smart homes, IoT, chatboots, robots, artificial intelligence, autonomous cars) based on the technology/service acceptance and consumer behavior theories
4. Develop relevant and concrete implications for technology/service acceptance strategies
5. Discuss research ideas with the professor and peer students

Research skills

Customer engagement & empowerment

Presentation and intended learning outcomes

A) Course description
Today, co-innovation with users is crucial for companies in both BtoB and BtoC settings. After understanding the most influential theories and getting an overview of the state-of-the-art knowledge behind innovative marketing, open innovation and co-creation with users (end-users and professional users), students are involved into different innovation real-life journeys and build relevant and innovative concepts on exclusive topics given by industrial actors (for instance: Pierre Fabre –“Digital Marketing and Seasonal Activation Campaign for Health Care Products” and Airbus –“Digital transformation” for the 2019/2020 academic year). Student will be asked analyze a sector and identify
user insights though qualitative and quantitative (databases provided by companies and consulting firms, opinions polls, focus groups, netnography, etc.) means. Students will also receive some training on quantitative methodologies to help them analyze these secondary data. Then, students will collaborate to co-create a solution. Students must respond to a firmly-defined problem and then think about the strategic and operational marketing for a new solution considering positioning and budgetary restrictions. This course puts the emphasis on a good complementarity between academic and practical insights.


B) Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:
1. Set-up a plan to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze deep users’ insights (through global user surveys, sales, KPI, brand image surveys, shopper studies, notoriety studies, global and digital campaigns effectiveness measures, brand investments, sell in/sell out data, etc.)
2. Analyze and synthesize large amounts of primary and secondary research data provided by companies and consulting firms
3. Develop a relevant, innovative, concrete and UX solution for all relevant stakeholders
4. Design a marketing plan that focuses on the value offering strategy
5. Meet and talk with experts, executives and managers (Competitive intelligence experts, prospective and market research managers, data analysts, digital transformation managers, process methods tools leaders, Products and brands managers, etc.)

Research skills

Research training seminars

Research training seminars

Presentation and intended learning outcomes

A) Description
These seminars are open to all students from TSM-DP 1st year. The purpose of this module is to provide students with a broadly based overview of current research skills to write your master thesis or your internship report.

B) Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:
- Identify an original research question
- Criticize the previous literature
- Set up a research design
- Explain research limitations
- Manage a research presentation

Research skills

1. Knowledge and intellectual abilities: Knowledge base; Cognitive abilities; Creativity
2. Personal effectiveness: Perseverance; Self-confidence; Time-management; Career management; Professional development
3. Research governance and organisation: Professional conduct; Research management

Core courses

Philosophy of science and epistemology

Presentation and intended learning outcomes

A) Course description

The purpose of this course is to present the problems encountered by researchers and PhD students when conducting qualitative research (the course will show that it is more accurate to speak of comprehensive research).


B) Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:

1. Characterize the nature of scientific knowledge
2. Debate about the epistemological and methodological problems of comprehensive research
3. Manage a case study
4. Describe results using redefinition of concepts, typology, and analysis by mechanisms
5. Develop a narration and a description

Research skills

1. Knowledge and intellectual abilities: Critical thinking; Intellectual insight; Argument construction.
2. Personal effectiveness: Self-reflection; Integrity.
3. Research governance and organisation: Ethics.
4. Engagement, influence and impact: Teaching.

Advanced quantitative methods

Presentation and intended learning outcomes

A) Course description
The course will cover empirical techniques that form the basis for quantitative research in management. The module is therefore design to introduce students to some of the core issues associated with empirical research through the review of some recent trends in research. The module will comprise a mixture of faculty-led lectures, interactive student-led presentations, and discussions.


B) Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:
1. Identify tools and resources: Data, statistical packages, tutorials and doctoral seminars, MOOC
2. Compare different quantitative research methods for designing a research project in business and management
3. Survey concrete scientific application of the quantitative method in a top-tier peer-reviewed journals
4. Point out possible challenges, in particular challenges for the validity, indentification, causality, diff-in-diff
5. Specify prerequisites, conditions, guidelines for implementation

Research skills

1. Knowledge and intellectual abilities: Research methods; Academic literacy and management; Problem-solving.
2. Personal effectiveness: Integrity; Perseverance; Responsibility; Reputation.
3. Research governance and organisation: Ethics; Research strategy; Project planning and delivery.
4. Engagement, influence and impact: Team working; Leadership; Communication methods; Communication media.

Advanced qualitative methods

Presentation and intended learning outcomes

A) Course description
A researcher needs to master the use of several methodologies in order to deeply understand studies in their field and to choose and to employ the most accurate method to answer their addressed research questions. The purpose of this course is to develop participants’ ability of reflective stance, supported by theory, and to be able to use qualitative research design and tools.

This course will cover four main topics: (1) Issues and challenges of qualitative inquiry in management research, (2) Core methods and practicalities of qualitative inquiry in management research, (3) Qualitative data analysis, (4) Ethical research practice. The pedagogical approach will be based on active learning. Students will have to read research articles before some of the classes. This material will then be discussed and analyzed collectively. Participation in the course is required and based on the quality and quantity of discussion contributions. The final assessment consists in a written final examination related to a previous exercise.


B) Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:
1. Identify and formulate appropriate qualitative research questions and interview questions
2. Analyze the main qualitative research methods
3. Assess different styles of presenting qualitative research findings
4. Develop an interpretive understanding of data collected
5. Collect and use qualitative data

Research skills

1. Knowledge and intellectual abilities: Research methods; Language; Problem solving; Argument construction.
2. Personal effectiveness: Self-reflection; Self-conficence; Time management; Integrity.
3. Research governance and organisation: Ethics; Research strategy; Project planning and delivery.
4. Engagement, influence and impact: Collegiality; Communication media; Communication methods.

Research ethics, plagiarism and academic integrity

Presentation and intended learning outcomes

A) Course description

This workshop looks at research ethics and the role of the researcher and allow student to acquire an overview of important issues in research ethics, like responsibility for research, ethical vetting, and scientific misconduct.


B) Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:
1. Discuss research ethics
2. Debate about plagiarism
3. Outline consent & data privacy
4. Analyze the replication crisis in social sciences and assess statistical power
5. Explain new trends of research: preregistration and open science

Research skills

1. Knowledge and intellectual abilities: Research methods; Analysing.
2. Personal effectiveness: Integrity; Reputation.
3. Research governance and organisation: Ethics; Respect and confidentiality; Appropriate practice.
4. Engagement, influence and impact: Public engagement

Intellectual property rights

Presentation and intended learning outcomes

A) Course description
This session will introduce students to intellectual property rights and more especially to main principles of copyright and application to the thesis.


B) Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:
1. Survey the intellectual property law: Interests, justifications, composition
2. Analyze rights of the authors
3. Describe main principles of copyright and application to the PhD thesis

Research skills

1. Knowledge and intellectual abilities: Academic literacy; Intellectual insight.
2. Personal effectiveness: Integrity; Reputation.
3. Research governance and organisation: Ethics; Appropriate practice.
4. Engagement, influence and impact: Global citizenship.

Writing retreat

Presentation and intended learning outcomes

A) Course description
The writing retreat is aimed at second year students. Its purpose is to provide dedicated writing time, while developing productive writing practices and discussions around writing-in-progess. Attendees will be required to bring their laptop and will be expected to commit to the full schedule. The writing retreat programme is the following one: Introductions, writing warm up, writing goals; Planning writing; Writing; Taking stock, setting new writing goals; Writing; Taking stock, new goals, feedback on retreat: outputs and outcomes.


B) Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:
1. Discuss research ethics
2. Debate about plagiarism
3. Outline consent & data privacy
4. Analyze the replication crisis in social sciences and assess statistical power
5. Explain new trends of research: preregistration and open science

Research skills

1. Knowledge and intellectual abilities: Research methods; Analysing.
2. Personal effectiveness: Integrity; Reputation.
3. Research governance and organisation: Ethics; Respect and confidentiality; Appropriate practice.
4. Engagement, influence and impact: Public engagement.

Track specific courses

Advanced methods

Presentation and intended learning outcomes

A) Course description
This course aims at exposing students with advanced skills to implement structural equation modelling, experimental and qualitative research. For each of the three methods, they will get hands-on experience with the most common softwares and will collect and analyze data. The course encourages problem-solving in data collection and analysis and prepare students to become autonomous in performing the empirical part of their thesis.


B) Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:
1. Propose new questions and hypotheses to test
2. Design an appropriate data collection and analysis plan to test these questions and hypotheses
3. Judge the quality and soundness of the implementation of a given method
4. Devise a research plan respecting the ethical standards and data integrity standards

Research skills

1. Knowledge and Intellectual abilities: Knowledge base; cognitive abilities
2. Personal effectiveness: Integrity; time management
3. Research governance and organisation: Ethics, principles and sustainability; research strategy; project planning and delivery
4. Engagement, Influence and Impact: communication methods

Hot Topics in Marketing Research

Presentation and intended learning outcomes

A) Course description
This course focuses on the process leading to the development of new research ideas. After a general introduction on strategies to find new contributions in the marketing field, the following modules will put the students in situation by asking them to propose avenue for future research on two recently emerging topics in behavioral consumer research. Students will have to lead and moderate a discussion in class based on a corpus of very recent papers, such that avenues for future research emerges from the discussion.

B) Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:
1. Develop new research ideas based on emerging conversations in the literature
2. Propose a methodological plan to test these ideas
3. Summarize, Compare and contrast different papers investigating the same phenomenon
4. Manage a fruitful class discussion to generate new research opportunities

Research skills

1. Knowledge and intellectual abilities: theoretical knowledge on research methods, synthesizing and critical thinking, intellectual insight
2. Personal effectiveness: perserverence, commitment to research
3. Research governance and organisation: appropriate practice, research strategy
4. Engagement, influence and impact: collegiality, collaboration and team working, communication methods

Writing, Reviewing, and Publishing

Presentation and intended learning outcomes

A) Course description
As an author or as a reviewer, publication is a demanding and rigorous process and researchers need to understand and to critically engage with the codes and practices underlying it. The purpose of this course is to initiate students to the writing, reviewing and publishing process. The course covers two main topics: (1) setting up, pitching and reviewing a paper as an author and as a reviewer, and (2) managing reviewers and the reviewing process. The pedagogical approach will be based on active learning. Students will have to read research articles or articles sections or book chapters before some of the courses but also to work on a review process based on example of paper effectively published. This material will then be discussed and analyzed in class. Participation is therefore a necessary condition to achieve the course objectives.


B) Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:
1. Select the appropriate writing form and conventions for research reports, literature reviews, theory papers, journal reviewing, and communication of research
2. Evaluate their own writing style, strengths, and weaknesses and plan for writing development
3. Practice the typical format of review comments and responses to these comments
4. Evaluate best practices in the review process and dangers of the review process
5. Discover ethical pitfalls in the review process and how to avoid them

Research skills

1. Knowledge and intellectual abilities: knowledge base; cognitive abilities, creativity.
2. Personnel effectiveness: integrity; self-confidence, career management.
3. Research governance and organization: ethics, co-authorship, appropriate practice.
4. Engagement, influence, impact: communication and dissemination; working with others.

Research training seminars

Research training seminars

Presentation and intended learning outcomes

A) Description
These seminars are open to all students from TSM-DP 2nd year. The purpose of this module is to provide students with a broadly based overview of current research skills to write your PhD dissertation.


B) Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:
- Identify mobility grants
- Discover the international job market conference
- Compare academic posters and analyse poster sessions
- Design a poster and resources to help with poster design
- Improve networking skills

Research skills

- Knowledge and intellectual abilities: Inquiring mind; Argument construction
- Personal effectiveness: Networking; Career management; Responsiveness to opportunities
- Research governance and organisation: Funding; Research strategy; Appropriate practice
- Engagement, influence and impact: Communication methods; Communication media; Collegiality

Teachers' pedagogical practices

Teachers' pedagogical practices

Presentation and intended learning outcomes

A) Description
It is a requirement of TSM that all PhD students who undertake any teaching duties should have attended the teachers' pedagogical practices which is designed for Postgraduate Teaching Assistants. The aim of this workshop is to address some of the basic skills and understanding teaching assistants will need for their work. It assumes that participants have little or no previous teaching experience.


B) Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:
- Draw on an inventory of best experiences
- Review best practices with senior instructors
- Diagnose recurring pedagogical issues
- Role-play a 30-minute lecture

Research skills

- Knowledge and intellectual abilities: Argument construction; Innovation
- Personal effectiveness: Career management; Continuing professional development; Reputation; Integrity
- Research governance and organisation: Ethics; Appropriate practice
- Engagement, influence and impact: Teaching; People management; Mentoring; Influence and leadership; Communication methods